Early intervention at risk by budget cuts

The safety and welfare of British children could become high risk, as SENCos, amongst many vital support staff roles are axed in a bid to batten down the hatches. According to the Association of School and College Leaders (ASCL), the recent freeze on school funding has led to more than a quarter of the 1300 schools it surveyed being prepared to make cuts in teachers and support staff.

In a time of austerity, where schools are losing vital safeguarding expertise with, in some cases, even part-time support staff are being drafted in, the question is what can be done to ensure that the remaining staff are proficiently trained in child protection?

In a recent interview with The Guardian, Dave Hill, president of the  Association of Directors of Children’s Services for 2016-17, shared his hope for the care system in 2017, quoting a much needed shift in how we invest our money, with an even stronger emphasis placed on early help. He went on to highlight how, in some councils, out of necessity, limited resources are used on high-end services – “firefighting&rdquot; rather than investing in preventative services. Frontline professionals in schools have a vital role to play here, with secondary school students spending over 700 hours each year under their care.

Now, for those teachers and support staff that do weather the storm, workload is inevitably going to rise. Safeguarding relies upon extreme vigilance and regular communication between staff and agencies and as resource pressures set in, where is this going to come from? Just this week, BBC News reported that support staff in Scotland’s schools are feeling exhausted, undervalued and stressed, according to Unison. The trade union said over 1800 jobs supporting teachers in schools had gone since 2010 which is having a direct impact on the workload of those remaining in post.

And finally, to the Department for Education, where the answer to the budget cut conundrum is to cut mainstream school “workforces” by £1.7bn over the next three years, I ask this: Where is the time and money going to come from to ensure the stalwarts still in post are properly trained and have the expertise to protect Britain’s children?

Safeguarding in a modern world: SSS Learning debuts fresh approach to online training at Education Show 2017

Schools and nurseries can now deliver the highest quality safeguarding training to meet statutory and Ofsted inspection requirements, whilst making vast cost savings with SSS Learning’s new e-learning courses, debuting at the Education Show 2017 (stand H81).

Developed as a ‘much needed’ catalyst for change in safeguarding training, the concise courses are fully CPD-accredited and certify individual educators, replacing ‘often insufficient or costly’ traditional group training methods.

Already used by over 60,000 frontline professionals to help protect children and young people from a broad spectrum of issues, the courses cover a broad spectrum of issues; from child protection and child sexual exploitation (CSE), to forced marriage and honour based violence, prevent duty (radicalisation and extremism) and Female Genital Mutilation (FGM).

The updated DFE (2016) Keeping Children Safe in Education statutory guidance emphasises the importance of regular updates and annual Safeguarding / Child Protection training. Under the Ofsted Common Inspection Framework, safeguarding remains a limiting judgement. SSS Learning’s secure online CPD accredited safeguarding courses enable schools and academies to meet this remit.

Sam Preston, eLearning and Training Director, SSS Learning said: “Our individual, online courses can be completed anytime, anywhere. All you need is an internet connection, enabling staff to fit training in around their busy schedules. Each engaging training video can be viewed individually, or even as a group during INSET and then every participant must log-on and complete the assessment. This ensures that every single member of staff is individually certified. Historically, most tutor-led, group training is delivered by INSET sessions on-site which is can be problematic. Fixed session INSET relies on the provider having the specialist area skillset which may not be setting or inspection requirement specific, individual learning outcomes cannot be not fully evaluated and those absent or staff recruited post INSET have to wait for refresher training which may be as long as a year later.

“As the courses are delivered online, SSS Learning has achieved significant cost savings for schools. The organisation utilises the very latest e-Learning technologies and techniques, using combined animation and video to produce high-quality online training courses engaging every learner. Individual progress can be monitored through the administration portal enabling leaders to monitor and ensure learning is secure.”

For further information, please visit the team on stand H81 at the Education Show (16th – 18th March 2017, NEC Birmingham), visit the web site at www.ssslearning.co.uk or call 029 2059 7000. You can also follow us on Twitter (@SSSLearning), Facebook (facebook.com/SSSLearning) or connect with us on LinkedIn.